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Google+ Shanee Nishry Twitter @Lunarsong

Hi and welcome to my blog in which I pretend to know HTML and hope nothing breaks :)

I am a game developer working at Google and I love graphics programming, virtual reality and game engine architecture.

Hope you'll enjoy my blog and feel free to reach out on social networks.

Comments? Feedback? Send me an email! stream+feedback@shanee.io.

You don't need a partner to do longsword drills. Joachim Meÿer gives us a wonderful tool which we can use to create a large amount of useful drills.

The Meyer Cutting Diagram, aka the Meyer Square.

How it works

The numbers create a sequence, their position mark an opening. Cut at a number and move to the next.

Looking at the outer sequence, 1 marks an opening on their upper left side (your upper right), the next is the exact diagonal opposite, their lower right. Next go opposite but not diagonally, their lower left and finally the last opening at their upper right.

Example:

  1. Cut an Oberhau from your right shoulder towards their head or shoulder at your right.
  2. Cut an Unterhau from your left at their hip, going back to the shoulder you cut to at 1.
  3. Bring your sword down and around and cut an Unterhau at their opposite (left) hip from your right.
  4. Cut an Oberhau at their right to the head or shoulder from your left.

Here is some of the translated text:

"step and strike first from your right against his left ear, as soon as the...

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Recently I came to act on a singular selfish and childish desire: "I want to play with swords". Unfortunately to get the most satisfaction from playing with swords you need a minimum of two people and the more the merrier, as a variety of people adds a mix of different skills and extra challenge which leads to more fun and insights. It is this that led me to start a local HEMA group.

Let's take a step back for a moment: I have been playing with swords for the past year and a half now, so what changed? In March this year I moved from Guildford (UK), where I studied with the School of the Sword and English Martial Arts Academy, to Mountain View, USA.

Being new to the area, I looked to continue my studies and found two accessible locations: Davenriche European Martial Arts School and Schola Saint George. The first is a well structured institute and the other a casual weekend meetup group ina park. For various reasons I decided I wanted more, and set out to get more people into HEMA.

It's worth noting that I label my meetups...

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If you are interested in Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA) and need help in choosing what to buy, then this is the post for you.

There has been a lot of talk about HEMA equipment and safety recently, partially regarding what is "appropriate protection" and on what is "good equipment". As I am running a small club that practices HEMA at Google and have experimented with quite a bit of equipment myself I decided to create this post both for my students to have as reference and for other people in the community.

I'll start by going over what I consider as appropriate protection and the risks we wish to prevent and then continue on recommending specific equipment to buy.

Appropriate Protection

Before we ask ourselves what is the protection that is appropriate, let us examine what we are doing and what are the risks involved.

There are different ways to practice HEMA, from purely technical drills at one end of the spectrum, to controlled flow sparring at the middle and full force sparring at the end of the spectrum.

Please mind your own and your partner's safety. You should always remain controlled and remember...

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This is a journal page from a D&D adventure played at Google London. It was written very late but someone might enjoy it.

"Ah, you are awake" said the red haired wood elf as the woman opened her eyes. Trying to speak, the woman realizes that she is gagged and tied to a tree.

That's right... She been knocked out.

The evening before...

After fighting off the werewolves, the group recovered the tracks of the wagon and have made their way north.

On the way they encountered the cart of a traveling merchant with two guards, going to see the chestnut festival. Garrett asked the merchant halfling if he had seen people with a similar pin to that of the cultists. The merchant who asked for money in return for the information had noticed Garrett, not happy to pay, trying to conjure an illusion of coins. Deciding the information is worth some coin, Garrett reached to offer 5 gold pieces.

Jenny who snuck into the merchant's cart decided otherwise and threatened the halfling with a dagger to the throat. The two guards guarding the cart were surprised to the appearance of the elf and unsure where to aim their crossbow,...

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The A* algorithm is most commonly used for pathfinding. However most developers neglect its ability to be used for other purposes.

In this post I will briefly go over the A* algorithm and then show how to generalize it and use it for purposes other than pathfinding, such as AI.

GOAP AI

Brief Introduction to A*

A* is an algorithm to find the shortest path from one node to another. It evaluates the current node and if it isn't the end node it finds all nodes linked from the current node, estimates their distance to the end node, sets the current node as a parent node, and adds them to a list called the open list.

The open list is then polled for the node evaluated as closest to the end and repeats the process until the end node is discovered or no more nodes are available in the open list, in which case there is no possible path to be found.

Heuristics

The estimation works by giving each node three heuristics, called the G, H and F costs:

G value is the cost of moving to this node from the start node. This is...

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Home About Recent Longsword Solo Drills - Meÿer Square Starting Historical European Martial Arts Group Historical European Martial Arts - Equipment D&D Journal: I Generic A* for Games Game development Generic A* for Games Procedural Island Generation Data-Oriented Design Matters Misconceptions of Component-Based Entity Systems Level of Detail Experiments Planet Generation - Part II Planet Generation - Part I Procedural Generation in Games Oculus Rift Integration Android Favorite Android Games NDK with Android Studio Android NDK Programming - Part III Android NDK Programming - Part II Android NDK Programming - Part I Personal Personal Stuff: Running! Global Game Jam 2014 Experiences Anime Claymore The Twelve Kingdoms Games Favorite Android Games Dungeons & dragons D&D Journal: I Historical european martial arts Longsword Solo Drills - Meÿer Square Starting Historical European Martial Arts Group Historical European Martial Arts - Equipment Longsword Longsword Solo Drills - Meÿer Square